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Eye scanner can detect molecular aging


Boston University Medical School
The Journals of Gerontology: Series A
Boston Children’s Hospital
Harvard Medical School
QLS
the Food and Drug Administration
FDA
the London Microbiome Meeting
Medical News


Lee E. Goldstein
Lee E. GoldsteinDoctors

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lifespan.”–
United Kingdom

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The New York Times
SOURCE: https://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/eye-scanner-can-detect-molecular-aging
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Summary

But while chronological age is very easy to measure, biological age is more difficult to assess.Although scientists know that there is wide variation in the processes of aging — for example, in the deterioration of cells and tissues — among individuals, there is currently no universally accepted measure of biological aging.In a new study that appears in The Journals of Gerontology: Series A, researchers led by Boston University Medical School describe a tool that could fill this gap.The researchers have developed a new eye scanner that detects molecular signatures of aging in the lens and is entirely noninvasive. Goldstein explains.“The absence of clinical tools and metrics to quantitatively evaluate how each person is aging at the molecular level represents a major impediment to understanding aging and maximizing health throughout life.”To address this, Dr. Goldstein and a team of investigators from institutions including Boston Children’s Hospital and Harvard Medical School looked to the eye.The eyes are a good measure of aging because they contain cells that are generated in the fetus and not replaced.

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