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After Trump's impeachment vote results, should Democrats try to censure the president?


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the Bank of the United States
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Louisiana State University
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Donald Trump
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Andrew Jackson
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the Battle of New Orleans
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Positivity     35.00%   
   Negativity   65.00%
The New York Times
SOURCE: https://www.nbcnews.com/think/opinion/after-trump-s-impeachment-vote-results-should-democrats-try-censure-ncna1130266
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Summary

The first and only time the Senate censured a president was in 1834, when it condemned Andrew Jackson, whose portrait hangs in the Oval Office where Trump now sits.Jackson, like Trump, read little and spelled poorly — the president he defeated in 1828, John Quincy Adams, labeled him a "barbarian."Jackson, like Trump, read little and spelled poorly — the president he defeated in 1828, John Quincy Adams, labeled him a "barbarian." Jackson also had an authoritarian manner, which he'd developed as a major general, and he claimed to understand, at the gut level, all issues a president needed to confront. He was, incidentally, as he exited the presidency in his 70th year, the oldest man to have served as president up to then.This site is protected by recaptcha Privacy Policy | Terms of ServiceIn 1834, exhausted by the seventh president's antics and unpredictable outbursts, senators in the rising Whig Party blew off steam by voting to censure Jackson for proceeding unlawfully in his campaign to destroy the Bank of the United States, an institution that afforded economic stability but that Jackson claimed was anti-democratic — and out to get him.An obvious question in this murky business concerns the non-punitive character of congressional censure. The famously independent Rep. John Quincy Adams, who despised Jackson, opposed the Whig-led censure in 1834 because he recognized it as a purely partisan device; in 1842, Adams sought a remedy for the veto-happy President John Tyler by formally studying whether to censure him, impeach him or rein him in by constitutional amendment.Falling short of impeachment, censure was meant as a moral statement absent any more serious punishment.Historically, Congress (either the House or the Senate) has weighed censure of a president as a form of reprimand for one or another abuse of power.

As said here by MSNBC