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Calls for outside help as extreme weather fuels Oregon fires


AP
the Rogue River-Siskiyou National Forest
Oregon State University’s
College of Forestry
the Biscuit Fire
Mesa Vista
the National Weather Service


Mike McCann
James Johnston
Klamath Falls
Bly
Sycan Marsh


American


the Pacific Northwest
the Bootleg Fire’s
West
the Bay Area
the Rogue River–
the Klamath Basin
Northern California
Sierra Nevada


Bootleg Fire
the Bootleg Fire
The Bootleg Fire
the Tamarack Fire


PORTLAND
Ore.
Oregon
Rhode Island
Portland
Fremont
California
Arkansas
Nevada
Alaska
Britain
Paisley
Long Creek
U.S.
Washington
Alpine County

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Positivity     39.00%   
   Negativity   61.00%
The New York Times
SOURCE: https://apnews.com/9a8021b4073fc50309ddf9bad479d956
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Summary

Evacuations and property losses have been minimal compared with much smaller blazes in densely populated areas of California.But eyeing how the Bootleg Fire — fueled by extreme weather — keeps growing by miles each day, officials with the Rogue River-Siskiyou National Forest in southwest Oregon are asking for more outside crews to be ready should there be a surge in fire activity there.“Although the lightning activity predicted for early this week is expected to occur east of us, we are prepared for the worst, and hoping for the best,” Mike McCann, an assistant fire staff, said Monday in a statement released by the national forest.The worry is that dry conditions, a drought and the recent record-breaking heat wave in the region have created tinderbox conditions, so resources like fire engines are being recruited from places like Arkansas, Nevada and Alaska.Meanwhile, to the east, the Bootleg Fire’s jaw-dropping size contrasted with its relatively small impact on people underscores the vastness of the American West and offers a reminder that Oregon, which is larger than Britain, is still a largely rural state, despite being known mostly for its largest city, Portland.If the fire were in densely populated parts of California, “it would have destroyed thousands of homes by now,” said James Johnston, a researcher with Oregon State University’s College of Forestry who studies historical wildfires.

As said here by GILLIAN FLACCUS