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Can the Jan. 6 Committee Subpoena Lawmakers? It?s Complicated


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The New York Times
SOURCE: http://time.com/6138561/jan-6-committee-non-complying-lawmakers/
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Summary

On Sunday, Ohio Rep. Jim Jordan, one of Trump’s closest allies, became the second Republican lawmaker to turn down the committee’s request for a meeting, calling it an “unprecedented and inappropriate demand” and an “outrageous abuse of the Select Committee’s authority.” Jordan’s decision to not cooperate with the investigation came shortly after Rep. Scott Perry of Pennsylvania also declined an interview request from the Jan. 6 committee, framing the panel as “illegitimate.”The select committee—consisting of seven Democrats and two Republicans—has been reluctant to issue subpoenas for sitting members of Congress, preferring to gather evidence through voluntary collaboration to avoid creating a complicated legal and political showdown. Former strategist Stephen Bannon and White House chief of staff Mark Meadows were held in contempt of Congress after they refused to comply with subpoenas requesting they meet with investigators, and both could end up serving time in jail if charged by the Justice Department.As the Jan. 6 committee evaluates its chances at enforcing subpoenas against members of Congress, legal experts warn about setting a potentially dangerous precedent.

As said here by Nik Popli