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Chip shortages lead to more counterfeit chips and devices


Independent Distributors of Electronics Association
MSI
Intel
UHD
ZDNet
Kindles
the Electronic Reseller's
Association International
the Ars Orbital Transmission
CNMN Collection WIRED Media Group
Condé Nast


Jim Salter
Jun 14
Steve Calabria
Diganta Das
Ars

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ERAI


Wuhan
shortage."Counterfeit
Alibaba
AERI

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Positivity     35.00%   
   Negativity   65.00%
The New York Times
SOURCE: https://arstechnica.com/gadgets/2021/06/chip-shortages-lead-to-more-counterfeit-chips-and-devices/
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Summary

Independent Distributors of Electronics Association (IDEA) founder Steve Calabria believes this two-fisted squeeze will spawn a surge in counterfeit electronics, with consequences for longevity and reliability of equipment built with substandard components.Pandemic lockdowns in industrial cities have pinched supply of both finished goods and raw materials, while demand for electronic products has skyrocketed due to both the need for remote work/school gear and simple boredom from people unable to travel, dine out, and party in the ways they're accustomed to.The immediate impact of this shortage is obvious and already well-reported—for example, it's so difficult to buy a graphics card right now that manufacturer MSI is bringing back the 2014-era Nvidia GT 730. When a company needs 5,000 parts next week in order to keep a line running, he says, "you won't keep to your rules of verifying the vendor or going through test processes."Das says it's still too early to notice a surge in counterfeit reporting databases like the one maintained by the Electronic Reseller's Association International (ERAI). But like Calabria, he's confident that a surge in counterfeit parts into the supply chain is already happening—and that it will become more visible in the months to come as companies must deal with the problems caused by the use of fake parts.This isn't a problem that is likely to impact the largest tech manufacturing giants, which buy their parts directly from the chip foundries that produce them in massive lots.

As said here by Jim Salter