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Cockney rhyming slang history | Roman Road LDN


bone’
scooby’
Double slang’
word’
Hampstead
teeth’
Barnet
starving’
Mile End
wrong’
Radio 1 DJ
DisneyLand
the East End
grundies’
Facebook
the Museum of London
the English Language
LDN
Bow, Mile End
Globe Town
Social Streets C.I.C



Cheapside
St Mary-le-
Aris
Aristotle
Cockneys
Kim West
Peckham
Hank Marvin’
Ruby Murray
Ayrton Senna
Paul Oakenfold
Pete
Pete Tong
Ibiza
Danny Dyer
The Kinks and The Streets
Reg Grundy
Joanna’
piannah’
Mary Demmel
Mag
Carol Legg’s
Artful
Artful Dodger
Scooby
Shakespeare
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barnet’
feet’
Greek
curry’
Australian
Aussie
East End
Londoners
Akismet
Roman Road


Rosy
Bermondsey
Boy’s
Roman Road


Roman Road Market
the Bow Bells


East London
plates’
East Ender
Tilbury
socks’
the United States
Del Boy
East Midlands
Derby
undies’
Victoria


me’

Positivity     46.00%   
   Negativity   54.00%
The New York Times
SOURCE: https://romanroadlondon.com/cockney-rhyming-slang-history/
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Summary

These phrases belong to the vernacular of Cockney rhyming slang, a code-like way of speaking that originated in mid-19th century East London. In 1987, Mile End born record producer Paul Oakenfold coined the slang phrase ‘It’s all gone Pete Tong’, meaning ‘a bit wrong’. Some phrases even made it to DisneyLand via the lamplighters and chimney sweepers of ‘Mary Poppins’.From old cockney classics, like ‘My Old Man’s a Dustman’, to the lyrics of The Kinks and The Streets, you may have heard some rhyming slang sing from your record player or through your speakers.Although it comes from the East End, the use of Cockney rhyming slang spreads far beyond the Bow Bells. A study carried out by the Museum of London in 2012 surveyed 2000 people, half of them Londoners, about their understanding and use of Cockney rhyming slang. The changing face of society, with new multi-cultural influences and the rise of virtual communication, is more aptly reflected in the contemporary slang of today’s youth.However, that’s not to say that Cockney rhyming slang is a distant memory.

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