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cosmological contradiction between the observed darkness of the night sky and a static universe model


1758–1840
Darkness at Night
universe:[7
U \over
CBR
ΛCDM
2017[update
CMB
BAO
Hz
kg/m3
IR
Cantor


Olbers
Heinrich Wilhelm Olbers
Topographia Christiana
Sun
Edward Robert Harrison's
Thomas Digges
Kepler
Halley
Kelvin
Edgar Allan Poe's
Mathematically

Arthur Eddington[10][11]
Jean-Philippe de Chéseaux
Carl Charlier
Benoît Mandelbrot
L(r)N(r
Contrarily


German
Greek
Copernican


Earth
Eureka

No matching tags


Alexandria
Planck
1.1×10−17

No matching tags

Positivity     44.00%   
   Negativity   56.00%
The New York Times
SOURCE: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Olbers%27_paradox#:~:text=In%20astrophysics%20and%20physical%20cosmology,infinite%20and%20eternal%20static%20universe.
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Summary

The only mode, therefore, in which, under such a state of affairs, we could comprehend the voids which our telescopes find in innumerable directions, would be by supposing the distance of the invisible background so immense that no ray from it has yet been able to reach us at all.[6]The paradox is that a static, infinitely old universe with an infinite number of stars distributed in an infinitely large space would be bright rather than dark.[1] In general relativity theory, it is still possible for the paradox to hold in a finite universe:[7] though the sky would not be infinitely bright, every point in the sky would still be like the surface of a star. The poet Edgar Allan Poe suggested that the finite size of the observable universe resolves the apparent paradox.[8] More specifically, because the universe is finitely old and the speed of light is finite, only finitely many stars can be observed from Earth (although the whole universe can be infinite in space).[9] The density of stars within this finite volume is sufficiently low that any line of sight from Earth is unlikely to reach a star. All points of the local sky at that era were comparable in brightness to the surface of the Sun, due to the high temperature of the universe in that era; and most light rays will originate not from a star but the relic of the Big Bang. The expansion of the universe causes the light from these distant stars and quasars to redshift, so that the total light flux from the sky remains finite. Thus the observed radiation density (the sky brightness of extragalactic background light) can be independent of finiteness of the universe. They both postulated that if the stars in the universe were distributed in a hierarchical fractal cosmology (e.g., similar to Cantor dust)—the average density of any region diminishes as the region considered increases—it would not be necessary to rely on the Big Bang theory to explain Olbers' paradox.

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