E.P.A. to Tighten Limits on Science Used to Write Public Health Rules


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The New York Times
SOURCE: https://www.nytimes.com/2019/11/11/climate/epa-science-trump.html
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Summary

Sign up here for Climate Fwd:, our email newsletter.WASHINGTON — The Trump administration is preparing to significantly limit the scientific and medical research that the government can use to determine public health regulations, overriding protests from scientists and physicians who say the new rule would undermine the scientific underpinnings of government policymaking.A new draft of the Environmental Protection Agency proposal, titled Strengthening Transparency in Regulatory Science, would require that scientists disclose all of their raw data, including confidential medical records, before the agency could consider an academic study’s conclusions. Among them were leading public health groups and some of the country’s top scientific organizations like the American Association for the Advancement of Science.The National Association of Pediatric Nurse Practitioners said it was “deeply concerned” that the rule would lead to the exclusion of studies, “ultimately resulting in weaker environmental and health protections and greater risks to children’s health.” The National Center for Science Education said ruling out studies that do not use open data “would send a deeply misleading message, ignoring the thoughtful processes that scientists use to ensure that all relevant evidence is considered.” The Medical Library Association and the Association of Academic Health Science Libraries said the proposal “contradicts our core values.”Industry groups said the rule would ensure greater public understanding of the science behind regulations that cost consumers money.

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