Please disable your adblock and script blockers to view this page

Election experts envision chaos as Biden and Trump fight over votes in November - Business Insider


Insider
he'll
Loyola Law School
Campaign Legal Center
the Brennan Center for Justice
New York University Law School
GOP
Trump
Getty Images
nation's
US Senate
Albert of Common Cause
The Democracy Docket
the Republican National Committee
State
Benson
the Southern Law Poverty Center
 
Washington University
AP Photo
File
down."Trump
Time
Obama's White House
Daley


Sylvia Albert
Donald Trump
Joe Biden
Bush
Gore
Justin Levitt
Adav Noti
Don't
David Boies
Al Gore
Joe Raedle
Hillary Clinton's
Barack Obama
Marc Elias
Katherine Harris
Jocelyn Benson
they're
COVID
Nancy Abudu
George W. Bush
Ed Reinke
Thea McDonald
Roger Stone —
Bill Daley
Barry Richard


Democratic
Democrats
Republicans
Americans
parties&apos
  

No matching tags


America First


Florida
US
the District of Columbia
Pennsylvania
Wisconsin
Michigan
North Carolina
the United States
Nevada
Montana
Miami-Dade County
the Sunshine State
California
Texas
New York
Ohio
Arizona
St. Louis
doesn't

No matching tags

Positivity     39.00%   
   Negativity   61.00%
The New York Times
SOURCE: http://www.businessinsider.com/election-biden-trump-florida-votes-counting-november-lawyers-chaos-2020-9
Write a review: Business Insider
Summary

Those are some of the worst-case scenarios that legal insiders and veterans of the contested 2000 presidential election are freaking out about less than two months before Election Day. Insider interviewed 15 election law experts and veteran political operatives who were involved in the Florida recount battle about the worst-case scenarios they're predicting for this fall. "It's gonna be Florida times 10," said Sylvia Albert, director of voting and elections at the watchdog group Common Cause. President Donald Trump and Democratic presidential nominee Joe Biden both have high-powered lawyers working preemptively to secure their side a legal edge heading into November and to stand ready to fight the election's outcome in court if things don't go their way. The Republican site even has a section that attacks Elias personally, warning that he and the Democrats are "watering down important election safeguards and increasing the opportunity for rampant fraud, abuse, and corruption." Both parties' websites highlight their legal strategies in battleground states like Florida, Pennsylvania, North Carolina, Michigan, Ohio, Wisconsin, Arizona, Nevada, and Montana. Like Florida's Katherine Harris in 2000, secretaries of state from swing states could play a starring role in post-Election Day ballot disputes. "I see myself almost as like the plumber of the process: My job is to make things work."Voting rights advocates are also trying to keep up legal pressure in other states that might not decide the election, but where they're expecting to see problems with election oversight. Bush in the 2000 Florida litigation, doesn't think an election fight will trigger an armed conflict."I don't think we will face civil insurrection," Richard, now a registered Democrat, told Insider in a recent interview.

As said here by Robin Bravender, Darren Samuelsohn, Dave Levinthal