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Fossils of oddball crocodile relative found in Texas suburb


National Geographic Society
National Geographic Partners
LLC
Scolomastax
the University of Wisconsin-Parkside
Arlington Archosaur Site
Laramidia
the Arlington Archosaur Site
the University of Tennessee
the University of Texas-Arlington
the National Geographic Society
Viridian
Cowboys
” Drumheller-Horton
the Dallas Paleontological Society
record.”Dallas
Perot Museum of Nature and Science
gratifying.”


”
Christopher Noto
Stephanie Drumheller-Horton
Derek Main
Art Sahlstein
” Noto
Deltasuchus
Soto


Appalachia


the Gulf of Mexico
North America
Appalachia
North America's
Asia


Scolomastax
Jurassic Park
the Arlington Archosaur Site


Arlington
Texas
Dallas
Canada
Utah

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The New York Times
SOURCE: https://www.nationalgeographic.com/science/2019/06/scolomastax-oddball-fossil-crocodile-relative-found-in-texas-suburb.html
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Summary

As the first paralligatorid ever found in Appalachia deposits, Scolomastax reinforces the notion that animals living in Asia and North America mixed and mingled in the early Cretaceous, before rising waters split North America in two.“The cool thing about the Arlington Archosaur Site is that it's actually from both a time [and a place] that we don't find many fossils,” says study coauthor Stephanie Drumheller-Horton, a paleontologist at the University of Tennessee. Noto took over the project that same year, and he has been leading its study ever since with partial funding from the National Geographic Society.If you're picturing windswept badlands like the fossil dig site scenes from Jurassic Park, the Arlington Archosaur Site may throw you for a loop: It's located within Viridian, a large planned community in Arlington, Texas, a suburb of the Dallas-Fort Worth area.“The funny thing about [the site] is if you stand up and you’re facing the wall where all the fossils are coming out, and you turn around, in the distance you can actually see the Dallas Cowboys football stadium,” Drumheller-Horton says.Odd though it may sound, the proximity to a major urban area has helped paleontologists protect and study the site.

As said here by Michael Greshko