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From interracial couples to people with disabilities: More inclusive emojis are on their way


Facebook
Emojipedia
Crohn
Harvard Medical School
NBC News
Carnegie Mellon University's
Tepper School of Business
Viciere
another."It
VenmoWant
NBC UNIVERSAL


Kendall Brown
Omar Sultan Haque
Rosalind Chow


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Asian
African-Americans

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Positivity     44.00%   
   Negativity   56.00%
The New York Times
SOURCE: https://www.nbcnews.com/better/lifestyle/interracial-couples-people-disabilities-new-inclusive-emojis-are-their-way-ncna969331
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Summary

These types of disabilities are not featured in the new fleet of emojis, but the new options are still a welcome update for her.“While the new disabled emojis don't directly visually represent my personal health conditions or how others perceive my body, it still feels like they represent my experience and my community, in a way,” she says. [More over], being able to represent the non-typical bodily state can be not only empowering, but a way in which people can communicate their experiences.”The richness of our language should match the richness of human experience, and that includes electronic language which is only getting more popular.People in interracial relationships will also now have emoji representation.Rosalind Chow, associate professor of organizational behavior and theory at Carnegie Mellon University's Tepper School of Business, says the "option is great for this sense of feeling equally valued and included by society.”Chow notes that her daughter enjoys sending emojis that portray her parents, but hasn’t yet been given the choice of an accurate representation.“She could never find emojis that represented our racial composition,” Chow says.

As said here by Nicole Spector