Please disable your adblock and script blockers to view this page

From Tamagotchi to 'Nintendogs:' Why People Love Digital Pets


Profile
PF Magic
Tamagotchi
Frontiers in Veterinary Science
Nintendo
Nintendogs
iPhone
Red Dead Redemption 2
Chtulhu
Apple
the Touch Bar
the MacBook Pro
Studio 46’s
Twitter
AAA
Bogo
iPad
Condé Nast
Affiliate Partnerships


Chelsea
Jean-Loup Rault
Neko Atsume
Android
Megan Liscomb
’d
David Fazzio
Tristan Cooper
Aavegotchi

No matching tags

No matching tags


Tamagotchi
California Privacy Rights.


Oddballz
the Touchbar Pet

No matching tags

Positivity     41.00%   
   Negativity   59.00%
The New York Times
SOURCE: https://www.wired.com/story/why-people-love-digital-pets-tamagotchi-nintendogs-dogz/
Write a review: Wired
Summary

These simulation-style games brought more realistic graphics, making the digital pet look and feel more real. This raised the bar even further in terms of what our digital pets could look like and the things they could do, but this felt still like a game more than an actual pet. At certain points you will interact with the human story characters and you’ll be pet, you can sit, lay down, and offer a paw.” Now I felt like I was getting closer to the reasons digital pets held such hold over users.The ability to rub your pet behind the ears seems an essential part of the design. Tristan Cooper owns the Twitter account “Can You Pet the Dog,” which collects data from users on which video games allow players to interact kindly with dogs (and sometimes other animals). “I think people who like to pet video game dogs do so with a range of perspectives,” he says. Some players just like cute animals.” There’s a positive feedback loop from petting in-game animals and receiving delighted reactions from them.Virtual reality developers are chomping at the bit to create pet games as well. Users can purchase their avatars and care for them much in the same way they did back in the ’90s.After looking at all of this, it’s clear that digital pets will always have something to offer us.

As said here by Wired