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Huawei fights back against U.S. blackout with Texas lawsuit


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SOURCE: http://feeds.reuters.com/~r/reuters/topNews/~3/0OSprjdUctk/huawei-fights-back-against-u-s-blackout-with-texas-lawsuit-idUSKCN1QO061
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Summary

In its lawsuit, Huawei said its “equipment and services are subject to advanced security procedures, and no backdoors, implants, or other intentional security vulnerabilities have been documented in any of the more than 170 countries in the world where Huawei equipment and services are used.” The privately owned firm has embarked on a public relations and legal offensive as Washington lobbies allies to abandon Huawei when building 5G networks, focusing on a 2017 Chinese law requiring companies to cooperate with national intelligence work. “More generally,” State Department spokesman Robert Palladino told reporters, “the United States advocates for secure telecom networks and supply chains that are free from suppliers subject to foreign government control or undue influence which would pose risks of unauthorized access and malicious cyber activity.” U.S. Representative Mike Conaway, a Texas Republican who has sponsored anti-Huawei legislation, called the Huawei lawsuit “bogus.” The NDAA bans the U.S. government from doing business with Huawei or compatriot peer ZTE Corp or from doing business with any company that has equipment from the two companies as a “substantial or essential component” of their system. Chinese foreign ministry spokesman Lu Kang said he had no information on whether China’s government may also seek legal action against the U.S. law, but added Huawei’s move is “totally reasonable and totally understandable.” Some legal experts said Huawei’s lawsuit is likely to be dismissed because U.S. courts are reluctant to second-guess national security determinations by other branches of government.

As said here by Sijia Jiang