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Is pot safe when pregnant? Study seeks answer, draws critics


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the National Institute on Drug Abuse
University of Washington
Children
The U.S. Food and Drug Administration
THC
the University of Washington’s
CBD
the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services
the National Institutes of Health
HHS
Marmion
critics’
the American College of Obstetricians
helpful.”The National Institute on Drug Abuse
Washington University
the University of Denver
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@LindseyTanner.___The Associated Press Health and Science Department
the Howard Hughes Medical Institute’s Department of Science Education


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Nora Volkow
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studies.”Among
Natalia Kleinhans
Pat Marmion
Karen Moe
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Mishka Terplan
Susan Weiss


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Positivity     37.00%   
   Negativity   63.00%
The New York Times
SOURCE: https://apnews.com/9e66d0b6e81049b193124c23307bdb87
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Summary

The agency has approved a synthetic version of THC, the part of marijuana that causes a high, for AIDS-related appetite loss and a similar drug for nausea caused by cancer drugs, but has not approved it for morning sickness.Scientist Natalia Kleinhans is leading the University of Washington’s study, aiming to recruit 35 pregnant marijuana users and 35 pregnant women who didn’t use pot.The pot users are asked to buy from licensed dealers and photograph it so researchers can calculate the THC and CBD, another compound that doesn’t cause a high. Researchers say MRI brain scans are safe and that infants will be tested while sleeping so won’t need potentially risky sedatives.While more than 30 states have legalized marijuana for medical and/or recreational use, opponents also note that the federal government still considers pot an illegal drug — a stance that scientists say has hampered research.Dr. Pat Marmion, an OB-GYN in southern Washington, says he helped coordinate efforts to file complaints with the university and the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, which oversees the National Institutes of Health.

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