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New Concrete Can Heal Millimeter Cracks in 24 Hours for Long Lasting Infrastructure | NextBigFuture.com


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SOURCE: https://www.nextbigfuture.com/2021/06/new-concrete-can-heal-millimeter-cracks-in-24-hours-for-long-lasting-infrastructure.html
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Summary

The work, published in the peer-reviewed journal Applied Materials Today, uses an enzyme that automatically reacts with atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) to create calcium carbonate crystals, which mimic concrete in structure, strength, and other properties, and can fill cracks before they cause structural problems.“We looked to nature to find what triggers the fastest CO2 transfer, and that’s the CA enzyme,” said Rahbar, who has been researching self-healing concrete for five years. • Inspired by the extremely efficient process of CO2 transport in cells, a self-activated healing mechanism for a cementitious matrix is proposed using Carbonic Anhydrase (CA) enzyme.• The CA Enzyme, a protein, is used here as a catalyst; hence it is not consumed in the process.• The rate of crystal precipitation in the proposed enzymatic mechanism can be can be up to four orders of magnitude higher than bacterial concrete.• Comparing to bacterial concrete the process is entirely safe and odorless. Current methods of repair by agents such as mortar and epoxies result in structures with reduced strength and resiliency due to material mismatch, therefore, a self-healing cement paste (concrete’s main matrix) is needed to overcome this problem.

As said here by Brian Wang