Review | For many immigrants, family separation happens long before the border


Trump
OFW
New York Times
Tita’s
Skype
Unwelcomed
U.S. Embassy
U.S. Foreign Service


Jason DeParle’s
Filipino Worker
Rosalie
Portagana
Emet
Deparle
’d
Rowena
Chris
immigrants’
Carlos Lozada
Samuel Huntington


Filipino
Hispanic
Asians
Latin Americans
English

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America
Manila
Abu Dhabi
Galveston
Tex
Philippines
U.S.
Saudi Arabia
the United States
the United Arab Emirates
Texas
Philippines’
riskTrump

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Positivity     42.00%   
   Negativity   58.00%
The New York Times
SOURCE: https://www.washingtonpost.com/outlook/2019/08/30/many-immigrants-family-separation-happens-long-before-border/
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Summary

That is, if acts born of despair can ever be described as entirely voluntary.In “A Good Provider Is One Who Leaves,” journalist Jason DeParle’s riveting multigenerational tale of one Filipino family dispersing across the globe, from Manila to Abu Dhabi to Galveston, Tex., and so many places in between, separation is a constant worry and endless toll. “Workers suffer the first to get the second.” With immigration a central battleground in the Trump-era culture wars, and with the southern U.S. border and Hispanic influx dominating the political debate, this book provides crucial insight into the global scope, shifting profiles and, above all, individual sacrifices of the migrant experience.DeParle, a New York Times reporter, tells the story of Emet, Tita and their daughter Rosalie, as well as their other children and grandchildren — a Manila family he first encountered and lived with for several months in the late 1980s. “Migration is history’s ripple effect,” he writes, noting how U.S. co­lo­ni­al­ism led to the establishment of the Philippines’ first nursing schools, an industry that would propel Rosalie to America a century later. And the ominous U.S. Embassy in Manila, the repository of so much hope and so many fears for Filipino visa seekers, is “the gateway to opportunity, but marines guard the gate.” The book is packed with insights masked as throwaway lines — lines that convey so much.So I wish DeParle had conveyed more about his own role in the story of this remarkable family. It is an entirely humane impulse, and DeParle stresses that the determination that got Rosalie to America “is hers alone.” But the author’s unexpected appearances complicate and at times confuse his narrative.“A Good Provider Is One Who Leaves” has political implications without being an overtly political work.

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