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Schools Are Dropping Mask Requirements, But A New CDC Study Suggests They Shouldn't


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the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
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the American Academy of Pediatrics
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the White House
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Positivity     38.00%   
   Negativity   62.00%
The New York Times
SOURCE: https://www.npr.org/2021/05/21/999106426/schools-are-dropping-mask-requirements-but-new-cdc-study-suggests-they-shouldnt
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Summary

Yet the study arrives as states and school districts across the country have begun scaling back or simply dropping their masking requirements for staff and students alike.With the majority of school-age children still too young to qualify for vaccination, Friday's research is the latest salvo in a simmering fight between public health officials and politicians — with parents lining up on both sides.The new study comes from Georgia and compares COVID-19 infection rates across 169 K-5 schools. The difference between schools that did and did not require students to wear masks was not statistically significant.This is one more study showing that masking, among other mitigation efforts, "can reduce infections and ultimately save lives," said Dr. Sean O'Leary, a professor of pediatrics at the University of Colorado and vice chair of the Committee on Infectious Diseases for the American Academy of Pediatrics.O'Leary points to a previous CDC study, of schools in Florida, that also found "a strong association with student mask requirements and lower rates of infections in students."Like any study, Friday's release comes with caveats.

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