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Secretive face-matching startup has customer list stolen


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Kate Cox
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The New York Times
SOURCE: https://arstechnica.com/tech-policy/2020/02/clearviews-list-of-law-enforcement-clients-lost-in-data-breach/
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Summary

Those other platforms and their parent companies—including Twitter, Google (YouTube), Facebook (and Instagram), Microsoft (LinkedIn), and Venmo—all sent Clearview cease and desist letters, claiming its aggregation of images from their services violates their policies.Clearview, which stresses its service is "available only to law enforcement agencies and select security professionals," refused repeatedly to share client lists with reporters from several outlets. It adds, "While many people have advised us that a public version would be more profitable, we have rejected the idea."Four days later, the company added another post, stressing that its code of conduct "mandates that investigators use our technology in a safe and ethical manner." While "powerful tools always have the potential to be abused," the company wrote, its app "has built-in safeguards to ensure these trained professionals only use it for its intended purpose."Clearview did not at any point say what these safeguards might be, however, nor has it explained who qualifies as "select security professionals."Other companies that partner with law enforcement for surveillance technologies have also not always been successful in attempts to keep their client lists on the down-low.

As said here by Kate Cox