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Space Photos of the Week: How Stars Get 86?d


NASA
Curiosity rover
OSIRIS
NGC
Bennu
Xiangyu Jin of
McGill University
the University of Southern California's Rocket Propulsion Laboratory
Lead Operations Officer
Condé Nast


Chandra X-ray Observatory
Bennu
Marsquakes
OSIRIS
Arielle Pardes
Neil Tewksbury


Martian
Canadian


Mars
Sun
Earth
the Inuvik Crater
Curiosity
Sun, moon


Hubble
Wide Field
California Privacy Rights

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Positivity     44.00%   
   Negativity   56.00%
The New York Times
SOURCE: https://www.wired.com/story/space-photos-of-the-week-how-stars-get-86d/
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Summary

As it turns out, this space rock is covered in um, a lot of rocks—so NASA is enlisting the help of the public to help count the boulders and map the surface. For example, note the contrast between the smooth sediment and the crater’s center rippling dunes.Imagine what it would be like to get booted out of your galaxy. As it turns out, this space rock is covered in um, a lot of rocks—so NASA is enlisting the help of the public to help count the boulders and map the surface. (And now we know the planet even has Marsquakes.) But sometimes this dusty planet can seem quite serene, almost lonely—especially when we imagine rovers like Curiosity and others cruising around, by themselves, looking up.Our next stop is on the asteroid Bennu and the OSIRIS-REx spacecraft, as it prepares to collect a sample from this ancient space chunk. Now that’s something we can all relate to.If you have to leave one place, remember this: There’s always another party, just like WIRED has more space photos, right here.A team from the University of Southern California's Rocket Propulsion Laboratory became the first student team to launch a rocket into space.

As said here by Shannon Stirone