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Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg dies at 87


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The New York Times
SOURCE: https://www.foxnews.com/us/ruth-bader-ginsburg-dies-at-87
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Summary

Today we mourn, but with confidence that future generations will remember Ruth Bader Ginsburg as we knew her -- a tireless and resolute champion of justice.” Ginsburg, who was appointed to the Supreme Court in 1993 by President Bill Clinton, was known for her soft-spoken demeanor that masked an analytical mind, a deep concern for the rights of every American and a commitment to upholding the Constitution. "She changed the way the Supreme Court views the issue, and she changed millions of people's lives in the process," said David Schizer, who served as a law clerk during Ginsburg's first year on the high court bench in 1993. She understood if you're trying to do something momentous, you should present it as quite ordinary."READ: SUPREME COURT'S STATEMENT ON RUTH BADER GINSBURG'S DEATHShe had battled back from two forms of cancer in the past but her health began to take a downturn in December 2018 when she underwent a pulmonary lobectomy after two malignant nodules were discovered in the lower lobe of her left lung.On Jan. 7, 2019, the Court announced she would miss oral arguments that day for the first time since she joined as she continued to recuperate from that surgery.Born in 1933 in Brooklyn, N.Y., young Ruth's early influence was her mother, Celia, who instilled in her daughter the value of education and dignity. So she went into teaching, and found a new calling."Those experiences along with others really galvanized her interest in women's rights litigation," said Margo Schlanger, a Washington University law professor and former Ginsburg law clerk.RUTH BADER GINSBURG HAS BEEN UNDERGOING CHEMOTHERAPY TO TREAT RECURRENCE OF CANCERHer personal experiences collided with monumental social changes in the 1960s. U.S. Supreme Court Associate Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg participates in a discussion at Georgetown University Law Center July 2, 2019 in Washington. “I had the great fortune to be alive and a lawyer in the late 1960s," said Ginsburg, "when for the very first time in the history of this country it became possible to urge before courts successfully that society would benefit enormously if women were regarded as people equal in stature to men."With the help of her students, Ginsburg argued six cases before the Supreme Court in the 1970s, winning five of them before an all-male group that included her future benchmates William Rehnquist, Harry Blackmun, and John Paul Stevens.Her strategy was to take a measured approach, carefully choosing cases that would promote equality but not appear radical to often skeptical federal courts."It was very much with the model of the NAACP's Legal Defense Fund, led by Thurgood Marshall," Schlanger said. President Bill Clinton names Judge Ruth Bader Ginsburg, of the United States Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia, to be Associate Justice of the Supreme Court in the Rose Garden of the White House, Washington DC, June 14, 1993. But that's not a view [held by more radical gender activists] that was very likely to succeed, and her approach did succeed."RUTH BADER GINSBURG RELEASED FROM HOSPITAL AFTER INFECTIONThat success brought Ginsburg a national reputation and in 1980 President Jimmy Carter nominated her to the prestigious U.S. Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia.Thirteen years later, President Clinton chose her to fill the Supreme Court seat of retiring Justice Byron White, citing not only her experience but her "big heart."Ironically some of the opposition to her nomination came from feminists, who did not like her criticism over the legal reasoning of Roe v.

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