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The fate of the filibuster: Your guide to the changes Dems really want


CongressEliminating
Senate
GOP
D-Conn
Jon Tester
minority.“It
D-Ore
D-Nev
the Supreme Court
POLITICO LLC


Chuck Schumer
Al Drago-Pool
MARIANNE LEVINE01/11/2022 04:30 AM
Joe Biden
Joe Manchin
Richard Blumenthal
Martin Luther King
Tim Kaine
Angus King
Smith Goes
Washington”-style
Jimmy Stewart
Kevin Cramer
BURGESS EVERETT
Jeff Merkley
Chris Coons
Harry Reid
Mitch McConnell


Democrats
D-W.Va
Republicans

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Kyrsten Sinema
Virginia
Montana
Maine

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Positivity     37.00%   
   Negativity   63.00%
The New York Times
SOURCE: https://www.politico.com/news/2022/01/11/how-the-senate-could-change-its-rules-filibuster-526865
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Summary

It’s not quite true.President Joe Biden’s party is trying for something narrower, discussing a menu of potential Senate rules changes that might help pass elections and voting rights legislation without outright eliminating the 60-vote threshold that’s now required to pass most bills. Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer has vowed that he will take up and vote on changes to the chamber’s rules by Monday, the holiday in honor of civil rights icon Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.’s birthday, if Republicans once again block Democrats’ elections reforms bill (which they plan to do).Should Schumer follow through, it’s possible the party gets Manchin’s vote for a small piece of reform. But until the party coalesces around a single proposal or set proposals, it’s hard to know what Manchin and Sinema will be pushed to vote yes on.Here are some of the options Democrats are discussing:Under current Senate rules, senators need 60 votes to end debate on most bills. It just lengthens the process," said Sen. Kevin Cramer (R-N.D.).Current Senate rules require 60 votes to even start to debate a bill, which allows a minority of senators to stop legislation from getting any floor consideration.

As said here by Marianne LeVine