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The Truth About NBA Home-Court Advantage


the Dallas Mavericks
NBA
TNT
Blazers-Mavericks
the Disney Wide World of Sports
LeBron
Raptors
The Portland Trail Blazers
Thurs
Lakers
the Staples Center
Pacers
Bankers Life Fieldhouse
Heat
Pitbull
PA
Oracle Arena
the Wharton School of the University of Pennsylvania
Scorecasting
Yale University
Kobe Bryant
Bleacher Report
the Los Angeles Daily News
the New York Times
the Associated Press Sports Editors
the Professional Basketball Writers Association
iTunes
@HowardBeck.
the Social Change Fund
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Michael Baiamonte
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Luka Doncic
Tobias Moskowitz
LeBron James
Anthony Davis
Brian Levenson
Reggie Miller
Lillard, seconds
Howard Beck
Mo Dakhil
Jim Boylen
Kobe Bryant


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Rockets
North American
Curry


West


the Portland Trail Blazers'
TD Garden
Bucks
Madison Square Garden


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Mavericks
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a Game 7
Game 4 of the Finals
Game 1 of the Finals

Positivity     43.00%   
   Negativity   57.00%
The New York Times
SOURCE: https://bleacherreport.com/articles/2905080-the-truth-about-nba-home-court-advantage
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Summary

You gotta make and create your own energy."The NBA has the widest home-court advantage among the major North American sports, with the home team winning 56-58 percent of all games in any given season. In the playoffs, it's even more stark, with the home team winning 65 percent of all games since 1984.Determining why has long been a source of fascination for coaches, players, trainers, psychologists, economists, statisticians and, well, everyone else.FINAL: Blazers 134 Mavericks 131 Every bubble game is simultaneously "home" and "away," both familiar and foreign, but not distinctly advantageous to anyone, no matter how many bells and whistles the league creates to make the designated "home" team feel at home.Up to 320 fans can "attend" bubble games via webcam, their ghostly likenesses beamed into virtual seats on the video boards around the court. The No. 2 seeds have also won 67 of 72 first-round series in that span, while No. 3 seeds have won 75 percent of the time.This isn't a league prone to upsets or surprises, especially in the first two rounds of playoffs.When a top seed loses a game at home, it usually makes up for it with a road victory, as good teams do. Conversely, if the home team was rested and the road team was not, the home team's winning percentage increases by 5 percentage points, to 63 percent.Every study seems to reach a different conclusion.A 2007 analysis from the Wharton School of the University of Pennsylvania determined that fatigue by the road team was "an important contributor" (though not a "dominant factor") in the NBA's home-court advantage.The book Scorecasting, published in 2011, dismissed fatigue almost entirely, along with any effects of crowd noise on teams. It's a natural tendency as a human to want to relieve that social pressure from 20,000 screaming fans."It's true that roaring crowds pump up the players, Moskowitz says, but not necessarily to the benefit of the home team. That would mean shorter series across the board, and likely more sweeps.Put another way: If the only way to defeat LeBron James and Anthony Davis is to wear them down with long flights and time-zone changes, then no one stands a chance in this environment.Brian Levenson, a mental-performance coach who works with NBA players and wrote his master's thesis on home-court advantage, believes performance often comes down to a simple concept: aggression."I would say the players I interviewed felt the crowd was the biggest factor," Levenson says. I don't worry about my family or my friends, or people asking for tickets, or my contract and living up to my contract." Yet another player spoke of that same confidence in reference to home games, saying the presence of family and friends and a supportive crowd made him more aggressive.All of which suggests that confidence and performance have more to do with how a player interprets his surroundings—and not the surroundings themselves."I think confidence comes from the way we talk to ourself and the dialogue we have with ourself," Levenson said.Some stars relish the chance to silence hostile fans. I miss being able to quiet a fan that's just talking to me throughout the game."Silencing "haters" is so embedded in the player psyche that Lillard, seconds after the Blazers wrapped up their victory over the Mavericks last week, turned toward the sideline and yelled, "Put some respect on my fucking name!"Technically, it was a Dallas home game.

As said here by Howard Beck