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These Confederate statues were removed. But where did they go?


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The New York Times
SOURCE: https://www.nbcnews.com/news/us-news/these-confederate-statues-were-removed-where-did-they-go-n1240268
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Summary

But that hasn't stopped activists from using the graffitied statue as a backdrop to project images of Floyd, as well as Rep. John Lewis, the civil rights icon who died in July.Some government agencies are using public task forces to determine what should happen to contentious monuments.At the Minnesota Capitol in St. Paul, protesters in June used a rope to topple a nearly 90-year-old statue of Christopher Columbus — one of about 30 of the Italian explorer across the country that were either vandalized or removed in support of Indigenous people.The Columbus statue's removal has forced a discussion of what monuments and artwork are most appropriate for the capital grounds, and it could be four to six more months before a task force decides the next steps, said Paul Mandell, executive secretary of the Capitol Area Architectural and Planning Board, which has oversight of the property."It's not 1492 anymore, and we know a lot of things about Columbus now that wouldn't merit him getting placed here," Mandell said.For now, he said, Columbus remains in storage.In Boston, the city's art commission is reviewing public testimony to help determine what to do with its Columbus statue, which is in storage after vandals decapitated it in June.

As said here by Erik Ortiz