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Who Are Online, Recruited by Advertisers and 4 Years Old? Kidfluencers


YouTube
Crayola
HomeStyle Harvest
Walmart
Staples
Mattel
Facebook
Google
Bios
the Campaign for a Commercial-Free Childhood
girls’
Taytum
Oakley
Carnival Cruise Lines
Kyler & Mad
Melissa & Doug
Everleigh
Viral Talent
Forbes
PAW Patrol Mighty
Disney
the Federal Communications Commission
The New York Times
Dreamworks
American University’s School of Communications
actors’
means.”Because
the Society of American Business Editors
Best Twitter Feeds


Sapna MaheshwariSamia
Adam
LaToya Ali
YouTube
Josh Golin
Kyler Fisher
Andrea Faville
Sravanthi Dev
Michelle Foley’s
Ava
Alex Chavez-Munoz
Txunamy
Captiv8
Ryan ToysReview
Nancy
Claire
Kathryn Montgomery
Barbie
Meghan McCarrick
Coogan Law
Adam Ali
@sapna •

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YouTube
Instagram
Atlanta
parents’
Walmart
California
New York
Louisiana
New Mexico


Instagram

Positivity     40.00%   
   Negativity   60.00%
The New York Times
SOURCE: https://www.nytimes.com/2019/03/01/business/media/social-media-influencers-kids.html
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Summary

The parent said brands might pay $10,000 to $15,000 for a promotional Instagram post while a sponsored YouTube video might earn $45,000. The toy company Melissa & Doug emailed parents about a six-week influencer campaign last summer, offering payments and free toys for weekly Instagram posts of their children “having fun with the toys!” The company said it would pay $10 per 1,000 followers for individual Instagram posts and $5 per 1,000 followers for Instagram Story posts. The rise of this kind of advertising has raised questions involving fair compensation, oversight and work permits, especially since child labor guidelines vary by state.Andrea Faville, a YouTube spokeswoman, said that the site didn’t allow anyone under 13 to make or own accounts and that it worked “closely with experts, nonprofit organizations and others in our industry to protect families using our services.” YouTube came under fire last month after lewd comments by pedophiles were discovered on innocent videos of children; the company has since said it will suspend comments on most videos of minors. Sravanthi Dev, a spokeswoman for Instagram, said that while the platform prohibited users 12 and under, their parents or representatives could create profiles for them “as long as it is clear in the bio information that the account is run by the parent or representative.” Michelle Foley’s 6-year-old daughter, Ava, and her best friend, Everleigh, also 6, have more than a million followers on their shared Instagram and YouTube accounts. But children, under their parents’ watch, are also building followings on YouTube and Instagram as gamers, video bloggers, fashionistas, mischievous toddlers and personalities who anchor family channels, which are often a cross between reality TV, pranks and random skits. Samia’s father, Mr. Ali, said, “She doesn’t have a concept of viral or ‘views,’ so it’s almost like, for her, walking into an experiment to learn something — it’s more of us giving her a task or assignment, where she has something to conquer.”He added, “We’ll know when she gets a sense of her following and let her know what this all means.”Because of an editing error, an earlier version of a picture caption with this article misstated who had said brands might pay $10,000 to $15,000 for a child's promotional Instagram post and $45,000 to sponsor a YouTube video.

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