Please disable your adblock and script blockers to view this page

With more girls pregnant, Zimbabwe pushes a return to school


MUREHWA
AP
the European Journalism Centre’s
European Development Journalism
the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation
Amnesty International
the United Nations
girls’
themselves.“Most
Doctors Without Borders
Mbare
Twitter: https://twitter.com/AP_Africa___See


Virginia Mavhunga
content.___The
Taungana Ndoro
Paul Nyathi
Sithembiso Nyoni
Tsitsi Chitongo
Tanaka Rwizi
Grace Mavhezha
Yvette Kanenungo


African
COVID-19
Zimbabwean


Africa

No matching tags


Zimbabwe
Virginia
Botswana
Namibia
Lesotho
Malawi
Madagascar
South Africa
Zambia
Murehwa —
Harare
parents’

No matching tags

Positivity     42.00%   
   Negativity   58.00%
The New York Times
SOURCE: https://apnews.com/0def070a417fe5dd1d106fe5fe710d8d
Write a review: Associated Press
Summary

Zimbabwe does have figures on pregnancies in girls who drop out of school — and while they show an alarming increase, officials say they, too, likely reflect an undercount, as many girls simply leave without giving a reason. Zimbabwe’s change in law gave community workers an opportunity to encourage girls to return to school. That girl lasted only a week in school, Chitongo said. They tell us, ‘I am already struggling to take care of my family; I can’t afford an extra mouth when the girl gives birth.’ So children are being chased away from home.”Some schools also discourage girls from returning, despite the recent change, Chitongo said. Most of the girls opt for the program over formal school because they need a skill that can help them “quickly make some money,” Mavhezha said. “Girls are banned from taking contraceptives due to traditional myths that our parents have, that girls cannot have sex until they are in their 20s or married,” said Yvette Kanenungo, a 20-year old clinic volunteer. “The truth is that the girls are already having sex, but cannot freely take contraceptives because of the no-sex-before-marriage decree at home.”For Virginia, the travel restrictions meant she was stuck at home in Murehwa after visiting her parents from her city school last year. “I would rather return to school than get married,” she said.

As said here by FARAI MUTSAKA