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XPRIZE selects winners of autonomous seafloor-mapping competition


XPRIZE
Shell
the US National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA
GEBCO
the University of New Hampshire
CubeSat
the SeaBed 2030 Project
the United Nations
the General Bathymetric Chart
the Oceans (GEBCO
the Ars Orbital Transmission
CNMN Collection WIRED Media Group
Condé Nast


Scott K. Johnson
Jun 1
Rochelle Wigley
Yulia Zarayskaya
Kuroshio
Takeshi Nakatani
Team Tao
Ars Technica Addendum


Kalamata
Japanese


the "Ocean Quest" team
Nast

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Greece
Puerto Rico
Ponce
San Jose
Calif.
Florida
UK

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The New York Times
SOURCE: https://arstechnica.com/science/2019/06/xprize-selects-winners-of-autonomous-seafloor-mapping-competition/
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Summary

Sponsored by Shell with a bonus prize from the US National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), the competition focused on the challenge of exploring the seafloor and saw 32 teams from around the world competing for $7 million.The primary goal was to build an autonomous, high-resolution seafloor-mapping system that could be launched from a similarly uncrewed boat. Their design used as many currently available components as possible, including a floating platform called a "SEA-KIT" with a conveyer-belt-like system for dumping the drone in the water and hoisting it back out when it returns.The second-place prize of $1 million went to the Japanese team "Kuroshio," composed of researchers and industry professionals led by Takeshi Nakatani. The project was launched in 2017 and already has the backing of a range of organizations including the United Nations and the General Bathymetric Chart of the Oceans (GEBCO) program that leads the University of New Hampshire training program responsible for the winning XPRIZE team.You must login or create an account to comment.Join the Ars Orbital Transmission mailing list to get weekly updates delivered to your inbox.

As said here by Scott K. Johnson